February 21, 2024

Adelaide Litt

Emerging Tech Trends

What Is Cloud Computing? The Definitive Definition.

Introduction

Cloud computing is a broad term that encompasses the use of cloud services instead of traditional hardware and software. You may have heard different definitions for cloud computing, but this one works well as an umbrella term for IT in the 21st century. With cloud hosting, you can get online storage and access to applications — all without buying and installing hardware or software. Cloud hosting also offers added flexibility with server uptime and performance management. The emergence of cloud computing has also allowed for more secure and auditable data storage options through encryption and mechanisms like HIPAA compliance.

Cloud computing is a broad term that encompasses the use of cloud services instead of traditional hardware and software.

Cloud computing is a broad term that encompasses the use of cloud services instead of traditional hardware and software. It can be used to describe any number of IT solutions and technologies, including cloud hosting, cloud storage, and cloud applications.

The term “cloud computing” was coined in 2006 by IBM as part of its marketing strategy for its own proprietary version of this technology (called IBM Cloud Computing). The idea behind it was simple: Instead of buying expensive servers from companies like Dell or HP (or building your own), why not rent them from someone else?

You may have heard different definitions for cloud computing.

You may have heard different definitions for cloud computing. In fact, it’s a broad term that encompasses many different types of services and technology. The definition of cloud computing is not agreed upon by everyone in the industry–it’s used to describe many different things.

What is cloud computing? That depends on who you ask!

This definition is broad, but it’s also useful because it captures many of the key characteristics of cloud computing.

You might be wondering how this definition can be so broad and still be useful. The answer is that it captures many of the key characteristics of cloud computing, even if it doesn’t capture them all.

It’s important to note that this isn’t the only definition of cloud computing–in fact, there are many others! But it is a good one because it covers some of the most important aspects of what makes a system “cloudy.”

With cloud hosting, you can get online storage and access to applications — all without buying and installing hardware or software.

Cloud hosting is a form of cloud computing that offers online storage and access to applications. It’s similar to renting an apartment, except you’re paying for the use of someone else’s property.

With traditional hardware and software, you have to purchase servers or desktop computers and then install the necessary programs on them before they can be used by your organization. With cloud hosting services like AWS (Amazon Web Services), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Rackspace or DigitalOcean (among others), however you can get started right away without having any equipment at all — just an Internet connection!

Cloud hosting also offers added flexibility with server uptime and performance management.

Cloud hosting also offers added flexibility with server uptime and performance management. Rather than having to purchase your own servers, cloud hosting allows you to access a large pool of servers that can be scaled up or down as needed. If one location experiences an outage, for example, you can move your website over to another region without any downtime or loss of data–allowing for uninterrupted service. Cloud hosting also allows users to monitor and manage the performance of their servers so they know exactly what’s going on with their websites at all times.

The emergence of cloud computing has also allowed for more secure and auditable data storage options through encryption and mechanisms like HIPAA compliance.

The emergence of cloud computing has also allowed for more secure and auditable data storage options through encryption and mechanisms like HIPAA compliance. The ability to store sensitive information in a third-party service provider’s environment means you can be confident that your data will be safe from malicious attacks or accidental exposure, even if that service provider is hacked.

This security does come at a cost: it’s often more expensive than on-premise systems because there are additional costs associated with maintaining those services (server space, electricity) as well as ensuring the integrity of their infrastructure against outside threats. However, many companies find it worthwhile because they want full control over how their information is stored and accessed while still being able to reap benefits like increased uptime and improved scalability

There are multiple ways to define cloud computing, but this definition works well as an umbrella term for IT in the 21st century.

The term “cloud computing” is a broad term that can be used to describe the current state of IT. It’s not a new concept, but it has become more common in recent years as more people and businesses rely on the internet for their day-to-day operations.

Cloud computing isn’t just about using the cloud–it’s also about using other types of distributed resources like servers, storage devices and even data centers (or “nodes”). These nodes are located all around the world and are connected by high-speed networks like fiber optics or wireless signals. This means that you have access to all of your files from anywhere at any time–you don’t need to be connected directly with each node individually!

Conclusion

In conclusion, cloud computing is a broad term that encompasses the use of cloud services instead of traditional hardware and software. The emergence of cloud computing has also allowed for more secure and auditable data storage options through encryption and mechanisms like HIPAA compliance.